Latest news from the right sources

News From RSS Feeds


CNN.com - RSS Channel - App Tech Section

CNN.com delivers up-to-the-minute news and information on the latest top stories, weather, entertainment, politics and more.

Facebook bug accesses iPhone's camera while user scrolls through News Feed - Facebook confirmed the bug was "inadvertently introduced" and promised a fix was in the works.
Facebook Pay aims to make it easier to send money across all of its apps - Facebook is taking another step to tie its massive social media applications more closely together at a time when there are mounting calls for the company to be broken up.
They left Facebook to make an app that will spice up your Instagram Stories - Chroma Stories is a new app offering photo filters, a variety of fonts and other special effects to help users jazz up their Stories for platforms including Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat.
T-Mobile CEO John Legere in talks to take over top job at WeWork - T-Mobile and Sprint are hoping to complete their merger soon. But the man positioned to head that new company is in talks to lead another major undertaking: a rescue mission for WeWork.
Singles Day sales for Alibaba top $38 billion, breaking last year's record - China's annual Singles Day online shopping bonanza has brought in a record $38 billion in sales for Alibaba.
Instagram is about to hide likes for some US users. Here's what to expect - Instagram is removing likes for some users in the United States, following similar tests in other countries, including Canada and Australia.
SpaceX launches 60 more internet satellites - SpaceX sent another 60 satellites into orbit on Monday, one of many such launches the company hopes to conduct over the next year as it works to build a massive broadband-from-space business.
Chinese team FunPlus Phoenix wins League of Legends World Championship - Every year, the world's biggest computer game, League of Legends, puts on a show at its World Championship esports finals complete with a huge opening ceremony.
How every company could become a 'tech' company - These days nearly every company is, or is in the process of becoming, a technology company. Major retailers have mobile apps and robust e-commerce platforms. Banks are getting into cryptocurrency. Grocery stores no longer expect customers to come inside to shop — they can place an order online and pick it up outside the store, or have it delivered right to their homes.
Colleges are helping students start careers in esports - Team SoloMid, partly known for its League of Legends competitive play, will be recruiting at UC Irvine and Santa Barbara for its summer 2020 internships and the potential for full-time positions. TSM is also looking to partner with Stanford and UCLA.
Instagram will test hiding US users' likes - Posting on Instagram can come with a rush of validation when likes from friends and strangers come pouring in. But those likes will soon be hidden for some US users.
These dog-like robots do backflips and play soccer. Yes, they're adorable - MIT's dog-like mini cheetah robots can do backflips and play soccer. Researchers took them out to frolic in the leaves on a fall day.
The internet thought it found the Trump whistleblower's picture. The internet was wrong - Right-wing social media accounts have been widely sharing two photographs that they claim show the whistleblower at the center of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump and prove that the whistleblower is biased against Trump and hopelessly untrustworthy.
Facebook and YouTube say they are removing content mentioning potential whistleblower's name - Facebook and YouTube said Friday that they were removing content that mentioned the potential name of the whistleblower whose complaint sparked an impeachment probe into President Trump.
Blackstone acquires dating apps Bumble and Badoo amid investigation into former owner - Bumble's embattled owner is getting acquired by investment firm Blackstone.
China's top ride-hailing company introduced a 'curfew' for women after riders were killed. It's being forced to backtrack - China's top ride-hailing firm is walking back one of its newest features after users accused the company of discriminating against women by preventing them using one of its services in the late evening.
-
Why this Apple executive says the US needs a new energy system - As wildfire season loomed in California last month, the executive who oversees Apple's environmental efforts told CNN Business that fires sparked in the state show the need to update the United States' aging energy infrastructure.
People just received text messages originally sent on Valentine's Day - Delayed text messages received overnight on Wednesday caused confusion, misunderstandings and even alarm for some recipients.
Searching for Google and YouTube in Big Tech's political ad controversy - You'd be forgiven for thinking that the only tech platform that allows politicians to run false ads is Facebook.








Slashdot

News for nerds, stuff that matters

UCLA Now Has the First Zero-Emission, All-Electric Mobile Surgical Instrument Lab - UCLA's new mobile surgical lab is a zero-emission, all-electric vehicle that will move back and forth between two UCLA campuses, collecting, sterilizing and repairing surgical instruments for the medical staff there. TechCrunch reports: Why is that even needed? The usual process is sending out surgical instruments for this kind of service by a third-party, and it's handled in a dedicated facility at a significant annual cost. UCLA Health Center estimates that it can save as much as $750,000 per year using the EV lab from Winnebago instead. The traveling lab can operate for around eight hours, including round-trips between the two hospital campuses, or for a total distance traveled of between 85 and 125 miles on a single charge of its battery, depending on usage. It also offers "the same level of performance, productivity and compliance" as a lab in a fixed-location building, according to Winnebago.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Unusual New 'PureLocker' Ransomware Is Going After Servers - Researchers at Intezer and IBM X-Force have detected an unconventional form of ransomware that's being deployed in targeted attacks against enterprise servers. They're calling it PureLocker because it's written in the PureBasic programming language. ZDNet reports: It's unusual for ransomware to be written in PureBasic, but it provides benefits to attackers because sometimes security vendors struggle to generate reliable detection signatures for malicious software written in this language. PureBasic is also transferable between Windows, Linux, and OS-X, meaning attackers can more easily target different platforms. "Targeting servers means the attackers are trying to hit their victims where it really hurts, especially databases which store the most critical information of the organization," Michael Kajiloti, security researcher at Intezer told ZDNet. There's currently no figures on the number PureLocker victims, but Intezer and IBM X-Force have confirmed the ransomware campaign is active with the ransomware being offered to attackers 'as-a-service.' However, it's also believed than rather than being offered to anyone who wants it, the service is offered as a bespoke tool, only available to cyber criminal operations which can afford to pay a significant sum in the first place. The source code of PureLocker ransomware offers clues to its exclusive nature, as it contains strings from the 'more_eggs' backdoor malware. This malware is sold on the dark web by what researchers describe as a 'veteran' provider of malicious services. These tools have been used by some of the most prolific cyber criminal groups operating today, including Cobalt Gang and FIN6 -- and the ransomware shares code with previous campaigns by these hacking gangs. It indicates the PureLocker is designed for criminals who know what they're doing and know how to hit a large organization where it hurts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A Fired Kickstarter Organizer Is Trying To Unionize Tech Workers Using Kickstarter - An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: In early September, the crowdfunding platform Kickstarter fired two union organizers in 8 days. One of them was Clarissa Redwine, who considered her termination to be a blatant act of retaliation for organizing what could become the first union at a major tech company in the United States. Although Redwine lost her job, she has not given up her vision. Today, she launched "Solidarity Onboarding," a new project designed to help workers unionize the tech industry -- using her former employer's platform. A collaboration between current and former organizers at WeWork, Google, Facebook, and other tech companies and coalitions, the project consists of an onboarding kit (booklet, pin, pencil, sticker) for tech workers interested in unionizing. "This kit is passed between coworkers as an act of solidarity and a signal that there is room to organize at your company," the project states. "Imagine the mirror image of a company's onboarding kit but for the tech labor movement," Redwine told Motherboard. "The focal point of this onboarding kit is a booklet of anti-worker statements. It's a collection of common talking point companies use to dissuade employees from taking collective action. Think of it as a union-busting artifact passed across companies from worker to worker." Within four hours of the project's launch, Redwine raised over 3 times her goal of $1000. The kit's booklet includes a collection of real anti-union quotes from tech CEOs -- including one from an email Kickstarter CEO Aziz Hasan sent to his employees in September, in response to the firings of Redwine and another union organizer: "The union framework is inherently adversarial. That dynamic doesn't reflect who we are as a company, how we interact, how we make decisions, or where we need to go." Another page includes a statement from an Amazon anti-union training video: "Our business model is built upon speed, innovation, and customer obsession -- things that are generally not associated with a union. When we lose sight of those critical focus areas we jeopardize everyone's job security: yours, mine, and the associates." "Clarissa's creative project is, of course, welcome on our platform," a spokesperson for Kickstarter said. "Kickstarter is a place where creators can share their ideas with the world and find people who want to support those ideas. We also welcome the continued dialogue among our staff members about the idea of a union at Kickstarter. We unequivocally support our staff's right to decide the unionization question for themselves."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

IBM's 200,000 Macs Have Made a Happier and More Productive Workforce, Study Finds - sbinning shares a report from AppleInsider: IBM has published its latest study focusing on the benefits of Apple products in enterprise, and has found that a fleet of over 200,000 Macs leads to far lower support costs, smaller numbers of support staff, and happier employees versus a Windows deployment. In the study presented on Tuesday, IBM says that employees that used Mac machines were 22 percent more likely to exceed expectations in performance reviews compared to Windows users. Mac-using employees generating sales deals have 16% larger proceeds as well. Turning to employee satisfaction, the first-of-its-kind study shows that Mac users were 17 percent less likely to leave IBM compared to their Windows counterparts. Mac users also were happier with the software available, with 5 percent asking for additional software compared to 11 percent of Windows users. A team of seven engineers is needed to maintain 200,000 Macs whereas a team of 20 is needed for that number of Windows PCs. During setup, the migration process was simple for 98 percent of Mac users versus only 86 percent of those moving from Windows 7 to Windows 10. Windows users were also five times as likely to need on-site support.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tesla's European Gigafactory Will Be Built In Berlin - Tesla's European gigafactory will be built in the Berlin area, Elon Musk said Tuesday during an awards ceremony in Germany. TechCrunch reports: Musk was onstage to receive a Golden Steering Wheel Award given by BILD. "There's not enough time tonight to tell all the details," Musk said during an onstage interview with Volkswagen Group CEO Herbert Diess. "But it's in the Berlin area, and it's near the new airport." Tesla is also going to create an engineering and design center in Berlin because "I think Berlin has some of the best art in the world," Musk said. Diess thanked Musk while onstage for "pushing us" toward electrification. Diess later said that Musk and Telsa are demonstrating that moving toward electrification works. "I don't think Germany is that far behind," Musk said when asked about why German automakers were behind in electric vehicles. He later added that some of the best cars in the world are made in Germany. "Everyone knows that German engineering is outstanding and that's part of the reason we're locating our Gigafactory Europe in Germany," Musk said. On Twitter, Musk said the Berlin-based gigafactory "Will build batteries, powertrains & vehicles, starting with Model Y."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Intel Fixes a Security Flaw It Said Was Repaired 6 Months Ago - An anonymous reader quotes a report from The New York Times: Last May, when Intel released a patch for a group of security vulnerabilities researchers had found in the company's computer processors, Intel implied that all the problems were solved. But that wasn't entirely true, according to Dutch researchers at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam who discovered the vulnerabilities and first reported them to the tech giant in September 2018. The software patch meant to fix the processor problem addressed only some of the issues the researchers had found. It would be another six months before a second patch, publicly disclosed by the company on Tuesday, would fix all of the vulnerabilities Intel indicated were fixed in May, the researchers said in a recent interview. The public message from Intel was "everything is fixed," said Cristiano Giuffrida, a professor of computer science at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and one of the researchers who reported the vulnerabilities. "And we knew that was not accurate." While many researchers give companies time to fix problems before the researchers disclose them publicly, the tech firms can be slow to patch the flaws and attempt to muzzle researchers who want to inform the public about the security issues. Researchers often agree to disclose vulnerabilities privately to tech companies and stay quiet about them until the company can release a patch. Typically, the researchers and companies coordinate on a public announcement of the fix. But the Dutch researchers say Intel has been abusing the process. Now the Dutch researchers claim Intel is doing the same thing again. They said the new patch issued on Tuesday still doesn't fix another flaw they provided Intel in May. The Intel flaws, like other high-profile vulnerabilities the computer security community has recently discovered in computer chips, allowed an attacker to extract passwords, encryption keys and other sensitive data from processors in desktop computers, laptops and cloud-computing servers. Intel says the patches "greatly reduce" the risk of attack, but don't completely fix everything the researchers submitted. The company's spokeswoman Leigh Rosenwald said Intel was publishing a timeline with Tuesday's patch for the sake of transparency. "This is not something that is normal practice of ours, but we realized this is a complicated issue. We definitely want to be transparent about that," she said. "While we may not agree with some of the assertions made by the researchers, those disagreements aside, we value our relationship with them."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft Starts Rolling Out Windows 10 November 2019 Update - Microsoft today started rolling out the free Windows 10 November 2019 Update. For those keeping track, this update is Windows 10 build 18363 and will bring Windows 10 to version 1909. From a report: The Windows 10 November 2019 Update (version 1909) is odd because it shares the same Cumulative Update packages as the Windows 10 May 2019 Update (version 1903). That means version 1909 will be delivered more quickly to version 1903 users -- it will install like a monthly security update. The build number will barely change: from build 18362 to build 18363. If two computers have the same servicing content, the build revision number should match: 18362.xxx and 18363.xxx. For developers, this means a new Windows SDK will not be issued in conjunction with this version of Windows (there aren't any new APIs). Again, the Windows 10 November 2019 Update is not a typical release. It's a much smaller update, though it is still worth getting. Windows 10 version 1909 brings improvements to Windows containers, inking latency, and password recovery. User-facing features include letting third-party digital assistants to voice activate above the Lock screen, being able to create events straight from the Calendar flyout on the Taskbar, and displaying OneDrive content in the File Explorer search box. You may also notice some changes to notification management, better performance and reliability on certain CPUs, and battery life and power efficiency improvements.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A US Federal Court Finds Suspicionless Searches of Phones at the Border is Illegal - A federal court in Boston has ruled that the government is not allowed to search travelers' phones or other electronic devices at the U.S. border without first having reasonable suspicion of a crime. From a report: That's a significant victory for civil liberties advocates, who say the government's own rules allowing its border agents to search electronic devices at the border without a warrant are unconstitutional. The court said that the governmentâ(TM)s policies on warrantless searches of devices without reasonable suspicion "violate the Fourth Amendment," which provides constitutional protections against warrantless searches and seizures. The case was brought by 11 travelers -- ten of which are U.S. citizens -- with support from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, who said border agents searched their smartphones and laptops without a warrant or any suspicion of wrongdoing or criminal activity. The border remains a bizarre legal grey area, where the government asserts powers that it cannot claim against citizens or residents within the United States but citizens and travelers are not afforded all of their rights as if they were on U.S. soil. The government has long said it doesn't need a warrant to search devices at the border.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The New Sonic the Hedgehog Movie Trailer is a Giant Relief - You can almost hear the sigh of relief from the global Sega fan community. The new Sonic the Hedgehog movie trailer, which Paramount released this morning, is a giant improvement. From a report: Our spiky hero no longer looks like a nightmarish experiment in avant garde taxidermy. The human teeth have been extracted. He has big doe eyes, not the sinister mini-peepers of the original trailer. The new design genuinely captures a lot of what original character designer Naoto Ohshima set out to achieve -- a cool but cuddly mascot, infusing Japanese kawaii sensibilities with American attitude. His fur is bright, mimicking the famed Sega blue of the company's classic arcade games. He is no longer absolutely terrifying, an important achievement for a family film.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Unites Payment Service Across Apps With Facebook Pay - Facebook said on Tuesday it was launching Facebook Pay, a unified payment service through which users across its platforms including WhatsApp and Instagram can make payments without exiting the app. From a report: The social network said the service would allow users to send money or make a payment with security options such as PIN or biometrics on their smartphones. Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg said earlier this year the company is planning to unify the messaging infrastructure across its platforms. He said the company would encrypt conversations on more of its messaging services and make them compatible as direct messaging was likely to dwarf discussion on the traditional, open platform of Facebook's news feed in a few years. Facebook said the new service will collect user information such as payment method, date, billing and contact details when a transaction is made and that it would use the data to show targeted advertisements to users.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Intel's Cascade Lake CPUs Impacted By New Zombieload v2 Attack - The Zombieload vulnerability disclosed earlier this year in May has a second variant that also works against more recent Intel processors, not just older ones, including Cascade Lake, Intel's latest line of high-end CPUs -- initially thought to have been unaffected. From a report: Intel is releasing microcode (CPU firmware) updates today to address this new Zombieload attack variant, as part of its monthly Patch Tuesday -- known as the Intel Platform Update (IPU) process. Back in May, two teams of academics disclosed a new batch of vulnerabilities that impacted Intel CPUs. Collectively known as MDS attacks, these are security flaws in the same class as Meltdown, Spectre, and Foreshadow. The attacks rely on taking advantage of the speculative execution process, which is an optimization technique that Intel added to its CPUs to improve data processing speeds and performance. Vulnerabilities like Meltdown, Spectre, and Foreshadow, showed that the speculative execution process was riddled with security holes. Disclosed in May, MDS attacks were just the latest line of vulnerabilities impacting speculative execution. They were different from the original Meltdown, Spectre, and Foreshadow bugs disclosed in 2018 because they attacked different areas of a CPU's speculative execution process. Further reading: Flaw in Intel PMx driver gives 'near-omnipotent control over a victim device'.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

As 5G Rolls Out, Troubling New Security Flaws Emerge - It's not yet prime time for 5G networks, which still face logistical and technical hurdles, but they're increasingly coming online in major cities worldwide. Which is why it's especially worrying that new 5G vulnerabilities are being discovered almost by the dozen. From a report: At the Association for Computing Machinery's Conference on Computer and Communications Security in London today researchers are presenting new findings that the 5G specification still has vulnerabilities. And with 5G increasingly becoming a reality, time is running out to catch these flaws. The researchers from Purdue University and the University of Iowa are detailing 11 new design issues in 5G protocols that could expose your location, downgrade your service to old mobile data networks, run up your wireless bills, or even track when you make calls, text, or browse the web. They also found five additional 5G vulnerabilities that carried over from 3G and 4G. They identified all of those flaws with a new custom tool called 5GReasoner. One purported benefit of 5G is that it protects phone identifiers, like your device's "international mobile subscriber identity," to help prevent tracking or targeted attacks. But downgrade attacks like the ones the researchers found can bump your device down to 4G, or put it into limited service mode, then force it to send its IMSI number unencrypted. Increasingly, networks use an alternative ID called a Temporary Mobile Subscriber Identity that refreshes periodically to stymie tracking. But the researchers also found flaws that could allow them to override TMSI resets, or correlate a device's old and new TMSI, to track devices. Mounting those attacks takes only software-defined radios that cost a few hundred dollars. The 5GReasoner tool also found issues with the part of the 5G standard that governs things like initial device registration, deregistration, and paging, which notifies your phone about incoming calls and texts. Depending on how a carrier implements the standard, attackers could mount "replay" attacks to run up a target's mobile bill by repeatedly sending the same message or command. It's an instance of vague wording in the 5G standard that could cause carriers to implement it weakly.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

American Robots Lose Jobs To Asian Robots as Adidas Shifts Manufacturing - Adidas plans to close high-tech "robot" factories in Germany and the United States that it launched to bring production closer to customers, saying Monday that deploying some of the technology in Asia would be "more economic and flexible." Reuters: The Adidas factories were part of a drive to meet demand for faster delivery of new styles to its major markets and to counter rising wages in Asia and higher shipping costs. It originally planned a global network of similar factories. The German sportswear company did not give details on why it was closing the facilities, which have proved expensive and where the technology has been difficult to extend to different products. Martin Shankland, Adidas' head of global operations, said the factories had helped the company improve its expertise in innovative manufacturing, but it aimed to apply what it had learned with its suppliers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Disney Plus' Launch Marred by Complaints of Service Failures, Login Problems - Disney Plus launched early Tuesday, and users are already complaining of service failures. From a report: So far, Disney Plus complaints are clustered in big cities in the Eastern US and Canada, lining up with the the areas likely to experiencing peak demand early Tuesday morning, according to outage tracker DownDetector. The tracker also showed complaints in the Netherlands, where Disney Plus launched as a subscription service Tuesday after operating as a free beta app for weeks. Disney said that demand for Disney Plus has exceeded its "high expectations." "We are pleased by this incredible response and are working to quickly resolve the current user issue. We appreciate your patience," the company said in a statement. The complaints run a gamut of errors, including difficulties logging in, inability to stream, app failures, shows and movies disappearing from the library and other problems.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Bug Has Camera Activated While People Are Using the App - When you're scrolling through Facebook's app, the social network could be watching you back, in more ways than just your data, concerned users have found. Multiple people have found and reported that their iPhone cameras were turned on in the background while looking at their feed. From a report: The issue came to light with several posts on Twitter, showing that their cameras were activated behind Facebook's app as they were watching videos or looking at photos on the social network. After clicking on the video to full screen, returning it back to normal would create a bug where Facebook's mobile layout was slightly shifted to the right. With the open space on the left, you could now see the phone's camera activated in the background. This was documented in multiple cases, with the earliest incident on November 2.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Search Slashdot - Search Slashdot stories





New Here Connect